24 NOVEMBER 2020

WHAT IS A DENIAL OF SERVICE?

BY SAM DENISON

A denial of service (DoS) is what happens when a website, computer device or service is overwhelmed so much that its normal function is disrupted.

 

A DoS can happen legitimately, when too many requests are made of a computer device or a server. More often however, a malicious actor will aim to render a device or service unavailable to its intended user. This is done by flooding the target of a DoS attack with more requests (collectively ”traffic”) than it can process.

 

When a service is inundated by traffic from one computer, this is known as a DoS. If there is more than one computer involved, then it is known as a distributed denial of service (DDoS).

 

The implications of DoS/DDoS attacks differ from other types of cyberattacks. They do not typically result in data breaches or thefts (as phishing does) but can instead immobilise a device or service. An interrupted service can mean for huge losses of money and time for a DoS target and all the while legitimate users are denied access to a service.

 

Cybercriminals often use DoS and DDoS to extort money from companies or institutions that have seen their services immobilise (hence “ransomware”). Hackers may also use DoS/DDoS attacks to subject a company to bad publicity or to create a distraction while other attacks are launched.

 

DDoS attacks have been deployed with increasing regularity in recent years. In the case of Lloyds Banking Group, a 2017 DDoS attack disrupted consumer banking services in the UK. No customers suffered financial loss nor was sensitive information released, but customers were unable to access online services for two days.

 

Mercury, by Secured Communications, is hosted on highly secure data centres which negates the threat of DoS/DDoS attacks. Indeed, our dedicated US servers withstand over 60 million attempted hacks per month and have never been penetrated. We also have access to an ultrasecure data centre in the UK. We only let trusted professionals and companies use our software, which acts as a further impediment to nefarious actors. We’ve also never had an outage, which is due to our resilient server capabilities.

SAN FRANCISCO | RENO TAHOE  | SYDNEY | LONDON

©2021 SECURED COMMUNICATIONS

  •  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Sustainability

EULA

SLA

SAN FRANCISCO | RENO TAHOE  | SYDNEY | LONDON

©2021 SECURED COMMUNICATIONS

  •  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

24 NOVEMBER 2020

WHAT IS A DENIAL OF SERVICE?

BY SAM DENISON

A denial of service (DoS) is what happens when a website, computer device or service is overwhelmed so much that its normal function is disrupted.

 

A DoS can happen legitimately, when too many requests are made of a computer device or a server. More often however, a malicious actor will aim to render a device or service unavailable to its intended user. This is done by flooding the target of a DoS attack with more requests (collectively ”traffic”) than it can process.

 

When a service is inundated by traffic from one computer, this is known as a DoS. If there is more than one computer involved, then it is known as a distributed denial of service (DDoS).

 

The implications of DoS/DDoS attacks differ from other types of cyberattacks. They do not typically result in data breaches or thefts (as phishing does) but can instead immobilise a device or service. An interrupted service can mean for huge losses of money and time for a DoS target and all the while legitimate users are denied access to a service.

 

Cybercriminals often use DoS and DDoS to extort money from companies or institutions that have seen their services immobilise (hence “ransomware”). Hackers may also use DoS/DDoS attacks to subject a company to bad publicity or to create a distraction while other attacks are launched.

 

DDoS attacks have been deployed with increasing regularity in recent years. In the case of Lloyds Banking Group, a 2017 DDoS attack disrupted consumer banking services in the UK. No customers suffered financial loss nor was sensitive information released, but customers were unable to access online services for two days.

 

Mercury, by Secured Communications, is hosted on highly secure data centres which negates the threat of DoS/DDoS attacks. Indeed, our dedicated US servers withstand over 60 million attempted hacks per month and have never been penetrated. We also have access to an ultrasecure data centre in the UK. We only let trusted professionals and companies use our software, which acts as a further impediment to nefarious actors. We’ve also never had an outage, which is due to our resilient server capabilities.

SAN FRANCISCO | RENO TAHOE  | SYDNEY | LONDON

©2021 SECURED COMMUNICATIONS

  •  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

24 NOVEMBER 2020

WHAT IS A DENIAL OF SERVICE?

BY SAM DENISON

A denial of service (DoS) is what happens when a website, computer device or service is overwhelmed so much that its normal function is disrupted.

 

A DoS can happen legitimately, when too many requests are made of a computer device or a server. More often however, a malicious actor will aim to render a device or service unavailable to its intended user. This is done by flooding the target of a DoS attack with more requests (collectively ”traffic”) than it can process.

 

When a service is inundated by traffic from one computer, this is known as a DoS. If there is more than one computer involved, then it is known as a distributed denial of service (DDoS).

 

The implications of DoS/DDoS attacks differ from other types of cyberattacks. They do not typically result in data breaches or thefts (as phishing does) but can instead immobilise a device or service. An interrupted service can mean for huge losses of money and time for a DoS target and all the while legitimate users are denied access to a service.

 

Cybercriminals often use DoS and DDoS to extort money from companies or institutions that have seen their services immobilise (hence “ransomware”). Hackers may also use DoS/DDoS attacks to subject a company to bad publicity or to create a distraction while other attacks are launched.

 

DDoS attacks have been deployed with increasing regularity in recent years. In the case of Lloyds Banking Group, a 2017 DDoS attack disrupted consumer banking services in the UK. No customers suffered financial loss nor was sensitive information released, but customers were unable to access online services for two days.

 

Mercury, by Secured Communications, is hosted on highly secure data centres which negates the threat of DoS/DDoS attacks. Indeed, our dedicated US servers withstand over 60 million attempted hacks per month and have never been penetrated. We also have access to an ultrasecure data centre in the UK. We only let trusted professionals and companies use our software, which acts as a further impediment to nefarious actors. We’ve also never had an outage, which is due to our resilient server capabilities.

SAN FRANCISCO | RENO TAHOE  | SYDNEY | LONDON

©2021 SECURED COMMUNICATIONS

  •  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Sustainability

EULA

SLA